New Paper: “Open Data Standards for Open Source Software Risk Management Routines: An Examination of SPDX”

I presented our paper Open Data Standards for Open Source Software Risk Management Routines: An Examination of SPDX at the ACM GROUP conference in Florida. GROUP is a single-track conference with a great group of participants. I enjoyed the interactions and presentations. GROUP is definitely worth going again. Also, single-track conferences may be my new preferences, because I do not have to decide which of several interesting session to go to.

Paper Abstract:

As the organizational use of open source software (OSS) increases, it requires the adjustment of organizational routines to manage new OSS risk. These routines may be influenced by community-developed open data standards to explicate, analyze, and report OSS risks. Open data standards are co-created in open communities for unifying the exchange of information. The SPDX® specification is such an open data standard to explicate and share OSS risk information. The development and subsequent adoption of SPDX raises the questions of how organizations make sense of SPDX when improving their own risk management routines, and of how a community benefits from the experiential knowledge that is contributed back by organizational adopters. To explore these questions, we conducted a single case, multi-component field study, connecting with members of organizations that employed SPDX. The results of this study contribute to understanding the development and adoption of open data standards within open source environments.

Read more…
The paper is Open Access and is available in the ACM Digital Library.

Full reference:

Gandhi, R., Germonprez, M., & Link, G. J. P. (2018). Open data standards for open source software risk management routines: an examination of SPDX. In Proceedings of ACM GROUP ’18 (pp. 219–229). Sanibel Island, Florida, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3148330.3148333

New Paper: “Contemporary Issues of Open Data in Information Systems Research: Considerations and Recommendations”

We hosted a workshop in Dublin before ICIS 2016. The workshop was on open data in information systems research. I lead the write up of our workshop report and am proud to say that we published it in the Communications of the Association for Information Systems journal.

Paper Abstract:

Researchers, governments, and funding agencies are calling on research disciplines to embrace open data – data that is publicly accessible and usable beyond the original authors. The premise is that research efforts can draw and generate several benefits from open data, as such data might provide further insight, enabling the replication and extension of current knowledge in different contexts. These potential benefits, coupled with a global push towards open data policies, brings open data into the agenda of research disciplines – including Information Systems (IS). This paper responds to these developments as follows. We outline themes in the ongoing discussion around open data in the IS discipline. The themes fall into two clusters: (1) The motivation for open data includes themes of mandated sharing, benefits to the research process, extending the life of research data, and career impact; (2) The implementation of open data includes themes of governance, socio-technical system, standards, data quality, and ethical considerations. In this paper, we outline the findings from a pre-ICIS 2016 workshop on the topic of open data. The workshop discussion confirmed themes and identified issues that require attention in terms of the approaches that are currently utilized by IS researchers. The IS discipline offers a unique knowledge base, tools, and methods that can advance open data across disciplines. Based on our findings, we provide suggestions on how IS researchers can drive the open data conversation. Further, we provide advice for the adoption and establishment of procedures and guidelines for the archival, evaluation, and use of open data.

Full reference:

Link, G. J. P., Lumbard, K., Conboy, K., Feldman, M., Feller, J., George, J., … Willis, M. (2017). Contemporary Issues of Open Data in Information Systems Research: Considerations and Recommendations. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 41(Article 25), 587–610. Retrieved from http://aisel.aisnet.org/cais/vol41/iss1/25/

Master Thesis Published in Journal

I am ecstatic about publishing my master thesis in a journal. I thank my co-authors who mentored me throughout the master thesis process and helped me achieve this goal. When I started the thesis project, I aimed for a conference publication and never dreamed that I would produce journal quality research on my fist attempt. The paper title is Anchored Discussion: Development of a Tool for Creativity in Online Collaboration.

Paper Abstract:

Open innovation and crowdsourcing rely on online collaboration tools to enable dispersed people to collaborate on creative ideas. Research shows that creativity in online groups is significantly influenced by the interaction between group members. In this paper, we demonstrate how theory can be effectively used to design and evaluate a tool for creative online collaboration. Specifically, we use the body of knowledge on creativity support systems to inform the development of a tool to support anchored discussions. Anchored discussions represent a new mode for creative interaction. In anchored discussion every comment is tied to some aspect of an idea. We evaluated the anchored discussion tool in a laboratory experiment, which generated insights for additional and refined research. Our results indicate that anchored discussion leads to a more structured discussion amongst group members and consequently to more creative outcomes. In a post session survey, participants made several suggestions on how to improve anchored discussion. This paper concludes that anchored discussion is promising as a new tool to aid online groups in creative collaboration. This paper extends a previous version presented at CRIWG 2015 [Link, 2015].

Read more…
The full paper is available open access from the J.UCS website.

Full reference:

Link, G. J.P., Siemon, D., de Vreede, G.-J., & Robra-Bissantz, S. (2016). Anchored Discussion: Development of a Tool for Creativity in Online Collaboration. Journal of Universal Computer Science, 22(10), 1339–1359. https://doi.org/10.3217/jucs-022-10-1339

Master Thesis Presented at CRIWG 2015

Ufff… so much work. For my master thesis project, I built a software prototype and recruited close to one hundred participants to test it in a controlled experiment. Going into the project, I set myself the goal to publish the results. I achieved this goal when my advisor, Dominik Siemon, presented the findings at CRIWG 2015. The title of the paper is Evaluating Anchored Discussion to Foster Creativity in Online Collaboration.

Paper abstract:

Open innovation and crowdsourcing ideas rely on people to be creative through an online collaboration system. Creativity in online groups depends heavily on the interaction between group members. Anchored discussion was evaluated in a preliminary laboratory experiment as a new mode for creative interaction. In anchored discussion every comment is tied to some aspect of the idea. This first exploration generated novel insights for additional and refined research. Results indicate that anchored discussion leads to a more structured discussion amongst group members. For the same level of creativity, groups using anchored discussion needed less interaction and less discussion than the control groups. In a post session survey, participants made several suggestions on how to improve anchored discussion. We conclude that anchored discussion is promising as a new tool to aid online groups in creative collaboration.

Full reference:

Link, G. J.P., Siemon, D., de Vreede, G.-J., & Robra-Bissantz, S. (2015). Evaluating Anchored Discussion to Foster Creativity in Online Collaboration. In N. Baloian, Y. Zorian, P. Taslakian, & S. Shoukouryan (Eds.), Collaboration and Technology (pp. 28–44). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22747-4_3

Verkehrter Verkehr

Es passiert noch immer, dass ich in entgegenkommende Wanderer laufe. Warum, weil ich rechts gehe und sie links. Dass der Verkehr in Neuseeland auf der linken Seite ist, verwirrt mich beim Wandern mehr als beim Autofahren.

Aber nicht erst in Neuseeland begegnete ich dem Linksverkehr. Schon in Singapur waren die Laufbänder auf dem Flughafen „verkehrt herum“. Auch in der Stadt lief ich immer wieder zu den falschen Rolltreppen und stieß gelegentlich mit anderen Passanten zusammen.

Rollbaender auf Flughafen in Singabpur

Rollbaender auf Flughafen in Singabpur

Weil alles mit Linksverkehr funktioniert, wird auch so gewandert, was zu den ungewollten Rempeleien führt. Mittlerweile werde ich besser, aber gelegentlich verfalle ich in die alte Gewohnheit des Rechtsverkehrs. Insbesondere dann, wenn ich begeistert die Umgebung in mich aufnehme und gedanklich darin versinke.

Ich beim Wandern im Regenwald

Ich beim Wandern im Regenwald

Als ich das erste Mal mit dem Auto auf Neuseeländischen Straßen gefahren bin, war ich so sehr mit dem neuen Auto beschäftigt, dass ich den Linksverkehr vergaß. Zum Glück saß Oliver neben mir und schrie entsetzt auf, dass ich im Gegenverkehr fahre. Das ist mir seit dem noch ein paar mal passiert, zum Glück immer mit Beifahrern, die mich ermahnten. Wenn ich dann erst einmal am Fahren bin, dann ist es auch gar nicht mehr so schwer. Auch wunderschöne Landschaften und atemberaubende Aussichten bringen mich dann nicht mehr durcheinander. Damit ihr wisst, was ich meine, hier ein paar Bilder…

Linksverkehr durch die Berge

Linksverkehr durch die Berge

Euer
Georg